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20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as well, rick santorum, whose 4-year-old daughter bella is disabled. he was one of the treaty's strongest proponents. here's what he said last month. >> this is a direct assault on us and our family to han
in what he said. because the united nations has absolutely zero, zero, i mean, zero ability to order or to tell or to even -- i mean, they can suggest, but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything other this treaty. nothing. >> well, as we told you last night former republican, repeat, republican attorney general testified before the senate foreign relations committee in july basically saying exactly that. there's no nothing in the treaty that interferes with u.s. laws. that didn't stop senator santorum to send out this e-mail. you did it. you made it happen. if it weren't for you the united states senate wouldn't have defeated the united nations convention on the rights of persons with disables and said it would have given the u.n. oversight of the health care and education choices parents with special needs kids need to make. had it been the law of the land it would have trumped state laws and could have been used as precedent by state and federal judges. that is not true. so, why the fudging of facts and we asked senator santorum on the program. he, too
't for you, the u.s. senate wouldn't have defeated the united nations convention on the rights of person with disability. he went on to say, quote, this treaty would have given the u.n. oversight of the health care and education choices parents with special needs kids make. had it passed, crpd would have been the law of the land under the u.s. constitution supremacy clause and trumped state laws and could have been used as precedent by state and federal judges. again, that's not true. why the fudging of facts? we asked senator santorum on the program tonight. he declined, and like the others that won't explain themselves, we can guess their motivations and frankly it's so baffling we're taking wide guesses and we don't want to do that. the treaty supporters say that politics and a paranoia about the u.n. trumped the rights of the disabled in this vote. ted kennedy jr. is a health care attorney and advocate for people with disabilities. when he was 12 years old he lost his leg to bone cancer. there's a picture of him taken with his dad six years after that. he's a strong support either of
't understand it, or he was just not factual in what he said. the united nations has absolutely zero, zero, i mean zero ability to order or to tell or to even -- they can suggest, but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. >> as we told you last night, former republican, repeat republican attorney general dick thornberg testified before the senate foreign relations committee in july basically saying exactly that. there's nothing in the treaty that interferes with u.s., federal or state laws, nothing. that didn't stop mr. santorum to send out this e-mail to supporters after the vote saying you did it. you made it happen. if it weren't for you, the u.s. senate wouldn't have defeated the united nations convention on the rights of person with disability. he went on to say, quote, this treaty would have given the u.n. oversight of the health care and education choices parents with special needs kids make. had it passed, crpd would have been the law of the land under the u.s. constitution supremacy clause and trumped state laws and could hav
it or was not factual in what he said. the united nations has zero ability to order or to tell or to even, they can suggest but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. >> tonight many disability advocate's rights say that the treaty trumps rights everywhere. he is the first quadrapalegic senator to serve in the house. you voted for this. why do you think it is so important? >> first of all, thank you for having me on the program. thank you for paying attention to this important issue. this is important for people here and for people around the world who don't yet enjoy the protections that people here enjoy in the united states. that law has transformed the lives of people with disabilities and i can speak to that first hand. i was injured in 1980 and i became paralyzed after a gun accident. i know what the world was like both before and after the ada. it is remarkably different. it is a shame that the senate couldn't pass that act yesterday. but i want to thank them for their leadership. the bipartisan support of the 61 senators who did vote
there now so dangerous, the united nations announced today it is immediately pulling all nonessential employees out of syria. arwa damon, one of the few western journalists inside syria right now. you have been to aleppo, where the assad regime has a chemical weapons plant. let's get perspective from the ground and start with the regime. what is it saying about this new u.s. intelligence and now new warnings from the united states all the way up to president obama about a red line on the use of chemical weapons? >> reporter: well, the regime has historically denied that it would use any sort of chemical weapons against its own population, but that is something of an empty promise, at least from the perspective of everyone we have been speaking to about this. many of those fighters that we talked on the ground do say they do believe the greater the strangle hold they have on regime forces in the city of aleppo grows, the greater the likelihood is that in a desperate attempt to somehow either regain control or wreak mass havoc on the population, the regime would not hesitate when it com
not factual in what he said, because the united nations has absolutely zero, zero, i mean zero ability, to order or to tell or to -- i mean, they can suggest. but they have no legal capacity to tell the united states to do anything under this treaty. nothing. >> tonight, many disability rights advocates are saying politics trump the welfare of the disabled everywhere. seven-term democratic congressman of rhode island is among the many supporters of the u.n. treaty, the first quadriplegic person to serve in the u.s. house. before yesterday's vote he talked with former senator bob dole in the senate chamber. the congressman joins me now. you voted for this treaty. you joined senator mccain and kerry earlier this week calling for its ratification. why do you think it's so important? >> first, anderson, thank you for having me on the program. thank you for paying attention to this very important issue. this issue is important, not just for people here in the united states, but most especially for people around the world who don't yet enjoy the same protections that people -- disabled peopl
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)